Antieco Life Blog

Jun 01

Moral of the story: don’t piss the planet off.

Moral of the story: don’t piss the planet off.

(Source: wbotd)

“If today is a typical day on planet Earth, we will lose 116 square miles of rainforest, or about an acre a second. We will lose another 72 square miles to encroaching deserts, as a result of human mismanagement and overpopulation. We will lose 40 to 100 species, and no one knows whether the number is 40 or 100. Today the human population will increase by 250,000. And today we will add 2,700 tons of chlorofluorocarbons to the atmosphere and 15 million tons of carbon. Tonight the Earth will be a little hotter, its waters more acidic, and the fabric of life more threadbare.” — David Orr - What Is Education For?  (via wildvoid)

(via climate-changing)

May 31

obon:

Less Boats. More Fish.

So what should the future of the tuna industry look like? Simply – fewer boats, more fish.We need fewer industrial-sized fishing boats chasing dwindling tuna populations. If we want fish for the future, we need to change the way we manage our oceans today.Read more here ☛ http://bit.ly/JEepgy

obon:

Less Boats. More Fish.

So what should the future of the tuna industry look like? Simply – fewer boats, more fish.

We need fewer industrial-sized fishing boats chasing dwindling tuna populations. If we want fish for the future, we need to change the way we manage our oceans today.

Read more here ☛ http://bit.ly/JEepgy

(via obon-deactivated20120627)

[video]

[video]

Is Healthy Food REALLY More Expensive? -

According to a new USDA study, healthy food may not be as expensive as it’s often made out to be.

For cost comparison purposes, foods have traditionally been judged on a cost per calorie basis. But using a cost per calorie comparison automatically penalizes healthier, nutrient-dense options, while favoring calorie-dense and often nutrient-poor options. In other words, the way previous studies have measured cost-effectiveness skewed their results to favor unhealthy options.

Although it’s cheaper to buy 100 calories of potato chips than 100 calories of broccoli, would your dollar actually be better spent on the broccoli? A team of researchers at the United States Department of Agriculture set out to tackle this question.

The research team analyzed 4,439 foods using three different cost comparison methods: cost per calorie, cost per edible gram, and price per average portion.

Although fruit and vegetables appeared more expensive when the cost per calorie method was used, a very different picture emerged when they used a cost per edible weight or cost per typical amount eaten basis.

When ranked by portion size, beef, chicken and fish were the most expensive foods, while grains were the least expensive. Fruit and vegetables were also less expensive than animal protein and “unhealthy foods” such as donuts, potato chips, and other processed items.

For example, the study found that a serving of potato chips is nearly twice as expensive as a serving of carrots. Carrots, onions, beans and potatoes emerged as particularly economical options.

Cost has long been cited as an excuse for not being able to eat well. But this study suggests that those on a limited food budget do not have to compromise good nutrition for cost. A USDA representative was quoted: “Many have raised concerns that those of modest means … can’t afford a healthy diet. The good news I take away from the study is that is not necessarily the case.”

(Source: soycrates, via obon-deactivated20120627)

(Source: summersands, via battlinggiants)

May 30

Because there are some places worth saving.

Because there are some places worth saving.

(Source: sirenchild, via myfavoritewildflower)

obon:

 German solar power plants produced a world record 22 gigawatts of electricity per hour - equal to 20 nuclear power stations at full capacity - through the midday hours on Friday and Saturday, the head of a renewable energy think tank said.

(click-through for full story)

obon:

German solar power plants produced a world record 22 gigawatts of electricity per hour - equal to 20 nuclear power stations at full capacity - through the midday hours on Friday and Saturday, the head of a renewable energy think tank said.

(click-through for full story)

(via obon-deactivated20120627)

kingdom-of-animals:

Polar bear by floridapfe on Flickr.

kingdom-of-animals:

Polar bear by floridapfe on Flickr.

(via climate-changing)

(Source: do-something-for-the-environment, via climate-changing)

earldax:

Source: globalissues.org

earldax:

Source: globalissues.org

(via climate-changing)

May 29

[video]

(via iliketolive)

obon:

America’s Most Innovative Neighborhood: 15 Square Miles In New Mexico, Population: 0

After years of pursuing high-tech companies, Hobbs will be getting what might be one of the most impressive high-tech novelties around: a 15-square mile, fully functioning but empty town next door, unlike any other R&D facility in the world, that will be used to test everything about the future of smart cities, from autonomous cars to new wireless networks.
To Hobbs Mayor Sam Cobb, this is the culmination of three decades of a city trying to reinvent itself. Back in the mid-1980s, it first became clear that the oil and gas industry that dominates this part of the country would no longer employ quite so many people, with quite as many high-end jobs.

obon:

America’s Most Innovative Neighborhood: 15 Square Miles In New Mexico, Population: 0

After years of pursuing high-tech companies, Hobbs will be getting what might be one of the most impressive high-tech novelties around: a 15-square mile, fully functioning but empty town next door, unlike any other R&D facility in the world, that will be used to test everything about the future of smart cities, from autonomous cars to new wireless networks.

To Hobbs Mayor Sam Cobb, this is the culmination of three decades of a city trying to reinvent itself. Back in the mid-1980s, it first became clear that the oil and gas industry that dominates this part of the country would no longer employ quite so many people, with quite as many high-end jobs.

(via obon-deactivated20120627)